Going solar in Massachusetts

In Massachusetts, an average home needs a 6kW solar system in order cover most of their electricity needs. Given the average residential price-per-watt of $4.18 in Massachusetts, a 6kW system can cost around $25,080 depending on applicable rebates and other factors.

Select your county by clicking on the map and see the potential generated solar power and panel pricing. See how it compares with the US state average.

Average out-of-pocket cost for a 5 kW system The upfront amount spent to buy and install solar.
Massachusetts: $20,900US Average: $19,594
Average Payback Period The number of years until you break even on the solar investment.
Massachusetts: 12 yearsUS Average: 13 years
Average Net 20-year savings The total amount of money saved over 20 years minus the out-of-pocket cost.
Massachusetts: $12,747US Average: $10,133

Solar Potential in Massachusetts

Estimated system size and solar electricity production per median viable roof in
Massachusetts.

Roof size 501sq. ft.
Capacity 7kW DC
Electricity 7.8kkWh AC per yr.

Go Solar for as low as $79/mo

Compare solar panels by system size in Massachusetts

Get the most value out of your roof by comparing the different benefits a given system size has.

System Size 2kW
Roof Size Min. space required
143 ft²
Electricity Value Annual Production $646 a year
Est. Price
$8,360
Savings from a 2kWthis system
  • Est. yearly production 2,735 kWh
  • Est. monthly savings $54
  • Full payback in 13 years
Environmental Impacts
  • Reduces CO2 emissions by 1.17 tons a year
  • Equivalent to planting 54 trees a year
  • Equivalent to driving 2,899 mi less a year
System Size 3kW
Roof Size Min. space required
215 ft²
Electricity Value Annual Production $969 a year
Est. Price
$12,540
Savings from a 3kWthis system
  • Est. yearly production 4,103 kWh
  • Est. monthly savings $81
  • Full payback in 13 years
Environmental Impacts
  • Reduces CO2 emissions by 1.76 tons a year
  • Equivalent to planting 81 trees a year
  • Equivalent to driving 4,348 mi less a year
System Size 4kW
Roof Size Min. space required
286 ft²
Electricity Value Annual Production $1,292 a year
Est. Price
$16,720
Savings from a 4kWthis system
  • Est. yearly production 5,471 kWh
  • Est. monthly savings $108
  • Full payback in 13 years
Environmental Impacts
  • Reduces CO2 emissions by 2.34 tons a year
  • Equivalent to planting 108 trees a year
  • Equivalent to driving 5,798 mi less a year
System Size 5kW
Roof Size Min. space required
358 ft²
Electricity Value Annual Production $1,615 a year
Est. Price
$20,900
Savings from a 5kWthis system
  • Est. yearly production 6,839 kWh
  • Est. monthly savings $135
  • Full payback in 13 years
Environmental Impacts
  • Reduces CO2 emissions by 2.93 tons a year
  • Equivalent to planting 134 trees a year
  • Equivalent to driving 7,247 mi less a year
System Size 6kW
Roof Size Min. space required
429 ft²
Electricity Value Annual Production $1,938 a year
Est. Price
$25,080
Savings from a 6kWthis system
  • Est. yearly production 8,206 kWh
  • Est. monthly savings $140
  • Full payback in 15 years
Environmental Impacts
  • Reduces CO2 emissions by 3.05 tons a year
  • Equivalent to planting 140 trees a year
  • Equivalent to driving 7,540 mi less a year

Massachusetts solar incentives, tax credit, and rebates

Massachusetts has 29 rebates and tax credits that you may be eligable for. Visit the official links for more details to see if you apply.

Solar incentives in MA

Concord Municipal Light Plant - Solar Photovoltaic Rebate Program

Value:Up to $3,125

Residential and business Concord Municipal Light Plant customers who install a new solar PV system on their property may be eligible for a rebate. The incentive amount will depend on system capacity. Both owned and leased systems qualify. To receive a rebate, the customer should include an installation agreement from a participating solar contractor and applications for grid interconnection. A CMLP representative will then visit the property to test and inspect the system. Additional information is available from the CMLP website.

Reading Municipal Light Department - Business Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

Value:Up to $25,000

Industrial and business customers of the Reading Municipal Light Department may be eligible for a variety of rebates on new energy-efficient equipment and improvement projects. Available programs and incentives will vary from time to time. Current offers include rebates on heat pumps, lawn/vegetation, lighting, and renewable energy generation (including special offers for solar PV. Improvement projects can be considered for rebates on a case-by-case basis; the owner will receive an incentive proportional to the size and savings impact of the project. Additional information is available from the RMLD website.

Commercial Solar Hot Water Rebate Program

Value:Up to $101,500

The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center is a state agency offering financial assistance to enable solar PV and thermal system ownership. Residential and commercial property owners may apply for a variety of loan or grant options. The Center also conducts and pays for feasibility studies on public, nonprofit, or agricultural properties. Feasibility study grants may be up to $5,000 for a single project with 5% cost-sharing. Applicants are limited to $50,000 in total grants paid. Grants may increase in value if they pertain to solar photovoltaics. The applicant's chosen solar contractor will complete CEC paperwork on their behalf. Additional information is available from the CEC website.

Chicopee Electric Light - Residential Solar Rebate Program

Value:Up to $12,000

Residential customers of Chicopee Electric Light who install new solar PV systems may be eligible for a rebate from the utility. The incentive amount depends on the system's rated capacity; the current rate is $1.20 per watt. At maximum, the rebate will cover $12,000 or half of the system's total purchase price and installation costs (whichever comes first). The system should be installed by a participating solar contractor and be interconnected to the grid. Additional information is available from the CEL website.

Residential & Small-Scale Solar Hot Water Program

Value:Up to $5,000

The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center is a state agency offering special rebates to enable solar thermal system ownership. Funding for the rebates comes from a surcharge on consumer energy bills. The incentive amount is determined by a standard equation that considers both the number of panels and the angle at which they are oriented. Solar Rating and Certification Corporation (SRCC) benchmarks for the system on a slightly overcast day of operation are also considered. Further rebates may apply if the customer participates in experience improvement or performance programs, or if they are within certain income brackets. Additional information is available from the CEC website.

Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant - Residential PV Rebate Program

Value:Up to $4,500

Single-family home customers of the Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant may be entitled to a rebate if they install a new solar PV system. Rebate amounts will vary depending on system capacity; customers will receive 60 cents per watt up to $4,500. TMLP effectively matches state rebates 1:1, meaning customers could earn a maximum overall incentive of $9,000. To apply, customers should provide proof of residency and purchase to TMLP and pay a $250 processing fee. Applications will be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis as annual state funding allows. Additional information is available from the TMLP website.

Hudson Light & Power - Photovoltaic Incentive Program

Value:Up to $5,000

Hudson residents who install new solar PV systems may be eligible for rebates from Hudson Light and Power. Eligible systems are divided into two "ranges" based on the orientation of the solar panels. A more ideal orientation will yield a higher incentive rate per watt. Currently, rebates top out at $6,000 for residential systems and $12,000 for commercial/industrial systems. To apply, the customer must seek preapproval from HL&P, including submitting cost estimates from their chosen solar contractor. Once preapproved, the customer has a one-year window to install the system and pass a final city inspection. Additional information is available from the Hudson website.

Excise Tax Exemption for Solar or Wind Powered Systems

Value:Varies

In Massachusetts, corporate excise tax exemptions may be available for wind or solar-powered water heating and HVAC systems. These systems would otherwise be assessed as tangible property. Once a taxpayer claims the exemption, they will not have to renew it for the length of their system's reasonable life, even as the system depreciates in value. Additional information is available from the Massachusetts Department of Revenue website.

Interconnection Standards

Value:Varies

Massachusetts has adopted measures to standardize interconnection and distributed generation practices in the state. New renewable energy systems planned to link to the grid are sorted into one of three capacity tiers: Standard, Simplified, and Expedited. The names of these tiers allude to permitting procedures and review times. Customers wishing to interconnect an energy system rated for over 500 W must obtain preapproval from their city or county, a process separate from standard permitting procedures. Utilities may require energy systems to meet IEEE/UL certifications and have external disconnect switches ready to use if necessary. Customers are required to carry a minimum amount of liability insurance for their system. Interested customers should consult with their local government to determine specific standards.

PACE Massachusetts Financing

Value:Varies

The Solar Massachusetts Renewable Target (SMART) program will act as the successor to the state's solar renewable energy credit initiatives. Currently, per carve-out provisions of the renewable portfolio standard, utilities must accumulate a certain proportion of SRECs each year. Should a utility fail to meet the minimum carve-out quota, it may purchase credits at auction. Should it fail to meet the quota after the auction, it will be assessed an alternate compliance payment of $350 per watt deficient. Solar customers generate SRECs through the use of their system. While they maintain ownership of their SRECs, utilities must offer to purchase the credits through net metering or other tariff compensation contracts. Credit prices are subject to market forces, but the SREC auctions offered to utilities can provide stability. Additional information is available from the SMART website.

Model As-of Right Zoning Ordinance or Bylaw: Allowing Use of Large-Scale Solar Energy Facilities

Value:Varies

Massachusetts communities are encouraged to enact "as of right" ordinances for owners of solar PV systems. Essentially, these ordinances would secure residents' and businesses' ability to install ground-mounted solar panels rated for larger capacities. A model ordinance is available from the state website which details suggested permit processes, fee schedules, setback requirements, interconnection guidelines, design requirements, and processes for special circumstances (for example, decommissioning of the panels.) The ordinance should also list conditions in which variances or exemptions might be warranted. Additional information is available from the Massachusetts Office of Environmental Affairs website.

Solar Renewable Energy Certificates (SREC-II)

Value:Varies

The Solar Massachusetts Renewable Target (SMART) program will act as the successor to the state's solar renewable energy credit initiatives. Currently, per carve-out provisions of the renewable portfolio standard, utilities must accumulate a certain proportion of SRECs each year. Should a utility fail to meet the minimum carve-out quota, it may purchase credits at auction. Should it fail to meet the quota after the auction, it will be assessed an alternate compliance payment of $350 per watt deficient. Solar customers generate SRECs through the use of their system. While they maintain ownership of their SRECs, utilities must offer to purchase the credits through net metering or other tariff compensation contracts. Credit prices are subject to market forces, but the SREC auctions offered to utilities can provide stability. Additional information is available from the SMART website.

Net Metering

Value:Varies

In Massachusetts, private utilities must offer net metering contracts to their renewable energy and distributed generation customers. Public or municipal utilities may offer net metering if they so choose. Under a net metering contract, interconnected renewable energy systems up to 10 MW in capacity will have a bidirectional meter installed to measure net excess generation (NEG) sent back to the grid. The utility will compensate the customer for both NEG and related renewable energy credits at a fixed avoided-cost rate. "Virtual" net metering arrangements are available for microgrid customers. NEG credits from the system's total generation will be proportionally allocated to each customer. Additional information is available from the customer's utility.

MuniHELPS - Offered by 17 Utilities through the MMWEC

Value:Varies

HELPS (Home Energy Loss Prevention Services) is a program managed by the Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale Electric Company. The program acts as an incentive program authority and "loss cushion" for eighteen municipal utilities that offer rebates on energy efficient equipment. By preventing financial losses from rebate disbursements, the utilities can safely and easily continue their own incentive offerings. HELPS representatives may also participate in energy audits to determine eligible projects for incentives. Additional information is available from the MuniHELPS website.

Cape Light Compact- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

Value:Varies

The Solar Massachusetts Renewable Target (SMART) program will act as the successor to the state's solar renewable energy credit initiatives. Currently, per carve-out provisions of the renewable portfolio standard, utilities must accumulate a certain proportion of SRECs each year. Should a utility fail to meet the minimum carve-out quota, it may purchase credits at auction. Should it fail to meet the quota after the auction, it will be assessed an alternate compliance payment of $350 per watt deficient. Solar customers generate SRECs through the use of their system. While they maintain ownership of their SRECs, utilities must offer to purchase the credits through net metering or other tariff compensation contracts. Credit prices are subject to market forces, but the SREC auctions offered to utilities can provide stability. Additional information is available from the SMART website.

Solar Massachusetts Renewable Target (SMART) Program

Value:Varies

The Solar Massachusetts Renewable Target (SMART) program will act as the successor to the state's solar renewable energy credit initiatives. Currently, per carve-out provisions of the renewable portfolio standard, utilities must accumulate a certain proportion of SRECs each year. Should a utility fail to meet the minimum carve-out quota, it may purchase credits at auction. Should it fail to meet the quota after the auction, it will be assessed an alternate compliance payment of $350 per watt deficient. Solar customers generate SRECs through the use of their system. While they maintain ownership of their SRECs, utilities must offer to purchase the credits through net metering or other tariff compensation contracts. Credit prices are subject to market forces, but the SREC auctions offered to utilities can provide stability. Additional information is available from the SMART website.

Holyoke Gas & Electric - Residential Energy Conservation Loan Program

Value:Varies

Residential Holyoke Gas & Electric customers may be eligible for special financing on new energy efficient equipment. What equipment is eligible may vary from time to time. Currently, loans can fund central HVAC, boilers, insulation/weatherization, windows, smart thermostats, and new solar or geothermal energy and thermal systems. The maximum available principal is $5,000 by default, but it raises to $10,000 if the project is solar in nature. Loans can be repaid over up to five years at 0% APR. HG&E services the loans themselves and payments will be made as a part of the customer's bill. Credit checks and energy audits may be required as part of the application process. Additional information is available from the HG&E website.

Renewable Energy Equipment Sales Tax Exemption

Value:Varies

In Massachusetts, new residential solar, wind, or geothermal energy devices which are directly involved in the production of power or heat are typically exempt from state sales tax. If a taxpayer owns multiple properties, only equipment at their primary place of residence will qualify for the exemption. Bay Staters wishing to file an exemption claim should submit form ST-12 (available from the MA Department of Revenue website) to their salesperson. The exemption can then be immediately applied to the purchase price.

Excise Tax Deduction for Solar or Wind Powered Systems

Value:Varies

In Massachusetts, corporate excise tax deductions may be available for wind or solar-powered water heating and HVAC systems. Deductions can cover the purchase price, installation costs, or operating costs incurred by purchasing and using the system. The only condition for a deduction to be granted is that the system must be used exclusively for business purposes. Once the credit is applied, the system will not qualify for any other tax incentives. Additional information is available from the Massachusetts Department of Revenue website.

Reading Municipal Light Department - Residential Renewable Energy Rebates

Value:Varies

Residential customers of the Reading Municipal Light Department may be eligible for rebates and local incentives on new solar photovoltaic systems. Incentive amount depends on the capacity of the system; the current rate is $1 per watt up to $2,000. RMLD effectively matches and exceeds state rebates of 60 cents/watt, allowing for a maximum rebate of $6,500. The program is funded annually with applications approved on a rolling, first-come/first-served basis. RMLD must pre-approve any rebate project, so interested homeowners should prepare and submit the application paperwork prior to purchasing their system. Additional information is available from the RMLD website.

Mass Solar Loan Program

Value:Varies

The Solar Massachusetts Renewable Target (SMART) program will act as the successor to the state's solar renewable energy credit initiatives. Currently, per carve-out provisions of the renewable portfolio standard, utilities must accumulate a certain proportion of SRECs each year. Should a utility fail to meet the minimum carve-out quota, it may purchase credits at auction. Should it fail to meet the quota after the auction, it will be assessed an alternate compliance payment of $350 per watt deficient. Solar customers generate SRECs through the use of their system. While they maintain ownership of their SRECs, utilities must offer to purchase the credits through net metering or other tariff compensation contracts. Credit prices are subject to market forces, but the SREC auctions offered to utilities can provide stability. Additional information is available from the SMART website.

Holyoke Gas & Electric - Commercial Energy Conservation Loan Program

Value:Varies

Business customers of Holyoke Gas & Electric may be eligible for special financing on new energy efficient equipment and improvement projects. Maximum principal varies depending on the project type. Eligible projects include HVAC/boilers/furnaces, insulation/weatherization, lighting, and solar PV systems/water heaters. Loans can be repaid over up to five years at 0% APR. HG&E services the loans themselves and payments will be made as a part of the customer's bill. Completed cost estimates from the customer's chosen contractor are required as part of the application process. Additional information is available from the HG&E website.

Energy Reduction Plan for State Buildings

Value:Varies

A 2007 executive order established green construction and energy efficiency standards for new and existing Massachusetts government buildings. The underlying goal of the order was to cut state buildings' energy use by 35% by 2020 and reduce the government's carbon emissions by 80% by 2050. New state buildings at least 20,000 square feet in size should meet LEED energy efficiency standards and seek certification from both the US Green Building Commission and the Massachusetts Sustainable Design Roundtable. Smaller projects are only required to meet state standards and do not have to be formally LEED certified. Existing buildings should adopt a variety of energy efficient practices and procure ENERGY STAR certified appliances and lighting. Additional information is available from the MA SDR website.

Massachusetts Green Power Purchasing Commitment

Value:Varies

Massachusetts has both a mandatory Renewable Portfolio Standard and a mandatory Clean Energy Standard. Public, municipal, and private utilities in the commonwealth are obliged to obtain a certain percentage of their energy from renewable sources. Quotas increase each year until 2029. The RPS covers new investments in solar, wind, geothermal, or other renewable energy farms. The CES covers existing energy facilities; "existing" is defined as those operating before the RPS was established. Certain "carve-out" provisions require utilities to utilize solar energy for at least a portion of their RPS compliance. Official documentation on each standard is available from the Massachusetts government website.

Renewable Energy Trust Fund

Value:Varies

At the same time Massachusetts established its Renewable Portfolio Standard, it also opened a public benefits fund to support public and private clean energy adoption. The Renewable Energy Trust Fund directly supports grants, financing, and customer rebates for solar, wind, biomass, hydroelectric, landfill/waste reclamation, and geothermal energy systems. The fund is supported by per-kilowatt hour surcharges on all customers of a private utility. Cooperatives or public utilities may collect surcharges voluntarily. The Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, which oversees the fund, submits annual reports on spending and compliance. These reports are available from the state website.

Renewable Energy Property Tax Exemption

Value:Varies

Solar, wind, and certain hydroelectric power and thermal systems in Massachusetts may be entitled to property tax exemptions. Exemptions last for 20 years and only apply to the value the system adds to the property. Systems that have additional purposes beyond the generation of energy (for example, maintaining structural integrity) do not qualify for an exemption; however, structural components of the system such as ducts or fans do qualify. Should the system be located in an Economic Opportunity Zone or Economic Target Area, tax incentives may be issued as a refund rather than an exemption. Property owners wishing to claim an exemption should contact their local assessor, as tax codes vary from county to county.

Mass Save - HEAT Loan Program

Value:Varies

The Mass Save HEAT program provides special financing to residential property owners to fund energy efficiency improvement projects. Currently, customers with National Grid, Eversource, the Cape Light Compact, Unitil, Columbia Gas, and Liberty Utilities qualify. Eligible projects for a Mass Save loan include central HVAC, heat pumps, windows, boilers, insulation/weatherization, and solar water heaters. The maximum available principal depends on the customer's utility, but will typically amount to $25,000. The loans can be repaid over up to seven years at 0% interest. Different terms and conditions may apply to low-income applicants. To apply, the customer should schedule an energy audit with their utility. Additional information is available from the Mass Save website.

Renewable Portfolio Standard

Value:Varies

Massachusetts first set a renewable portfolio standard in 2002 after establishing the framework in 1997. RPS regulations and compliance are handled by the Department of Energy Resources (DOER). Currently, at least 16% of retail energy generated in Massachusetts should be sourced from renewable means. Solar, wind, hydroelectric, biomass, landfill gas reclamation, and fuel cells qualify. "Carve out" regulations require the state's utilities to fulfill at least 1,600 MW of the standard using solar photovoltaics specifically. Compliance is measured through a renewable energy credit (REC) system pegging a certain wattage to a fixed dollar value. Solar renewable energy credits (SRECs) measure compliance with the solar carve-out regulations. Customers technically own the RECs and/or SRECs they generate, but utilities are required to purchase them through net metering contracts to fulfill their portion of the standard. Additional information is available through the DOER website.

Green Communities Grant Program

Value:Varies

NOTE: This program is no longer accepting applications as of winter 2017. Massachusetts legislators enacted the Green Communities Act of 2008 to support municipalities transitioning to clean energy or making energy efficiency improvements. The Green Communities program offered the full breadth of advisory services to community managers, including technical support for existing energy systems. Communities could also receive grants and other financial incentives to support new equipment and improvements. Interested jurisdictions were required to pursue Green Community certification, which involved creating energy savings goals, streamlining permit procedures, and establishing green building standards.

Go Solar for less than your cell phone bill.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • As a general rule, unless there are local limitations, the main limitations to the amount of solar panels you can put on your roof are the available space on your roof, your electricity usage, your providers net metering rules, and the limitations of your house hold electrical system.
  • Based on our research the average price per installed watt is $4.18 in Massachusetts. This means for a 10kW system you can expect to pay $41,800 though pricing can vary significantly between installers based on the projects requirements.
  • Based on a Zillow research study from 2019, home with solar panels sell for roughly 4.1% more.
  • To generate the most power, solar panels in the United States should face true south as this generally results in the solar panels receiving the most light each day throughout the course of the year. That said, given that energy prices are often variable throughout the day, your installer may recommend you rotate your panels slightly so that the panels will receive more light at the end of the day when energy prices can be more expensive. That said, for most consumers the positioning of solar panels is highly dependent on your home's roof.
  • Based on our continuously updated database of solar installers, we have found 37 verified solar install companies in Massachusetts

Solar installers in Massachusetts (37)

PV Squared

Greenfield Town, MA(413) 772-8788

Services

  • Installation of solar arrays.
  • Installation of batteries for energy storage.

Green Power Energy

Annandale CDP, NJ(844) 584-0008

Services

  • Installation of solar arrays.
  • Reparation of solar arrays.
  • Installation of batteries for energy storage.
  • Monitoring of independent energy generation.
  • Expertise in consulting on advantageous financing for solar.

Plug PV

Albany, NY(518) 948-5316

Services

  • Installation of solar arrays.
  • Installation of batteries for energy storage.
  • Monitoring of independent energy generation.
  • Expertise in consulting on advantageous financing for solar.

Earthlight Technologies

(860) 871-9700

Services

  • Installation of solar arrays.
  • Reparation of solar arrays.
  • Installation of batteries for energy storage.
  • Monitoring of independent energy generation.
  • Expertise in consulting on advantageous financing for solar.

Alternate Power & Energy

Fall River, MA(508) 525-3013

Services

  • Installation of solar arrays.
  • Expertise in consulting on advantageous financing for solar.
  • Consulting on all things solar related.

Intelligent Solar Services

(978) 612-6075

Services

  • Installation of solar arrays.
  • Reparation of solar arrays.
  • Installation of batteries for energy storage.
  • Reparation of batteries.
  • Consulting on all things solar related.

Sunlight Solar Energy

Bend, OR(541) 322-1910

Services

  • Installation of solar arrays.
  • Reparation of solar arrays.
  • Installation of batteries for energy storage.
  • Solar systems for selling electricity back to the grid.
  • Expertise in consulting on advantageous financing for solar.
  • Consulting on all things solar related.

Sunwatt Solar

Pawtucket, RI(844) 786-9288

Services

  • Installation of solar arrays.
  • Installation of batteries for energy storage.
  • Monitoring of independent energy generation.
  • Expertise in consulting on advantageous financing for solar.

Summit Energy Group

Weymouth Town, MA(888) 578-6648

Services

  • Installation of solar arrays.
  • Installation of batteries for energy storage.
  • Expertise in consulting on advantageous financing for solar.

CES

Middletown, CT(860) 632-1682

Services

  • Installation of solar arrays.
  • Auditing of energy requirements for independent energy generation.
  • Consulting on all things solar related.

Entero Energy

Austin, TX(512) 551-0742

Services

  • Installation of solar arrays.
  • Installation of batteries for energy storage.
  • Solar systems for selling electricity back to the grid.

SunBug Solar

Woburn, MA(617) 500-3938

Services

  • Installation of solar arrays.
  • Installation of batteries for energy storage.
  • Monitoring of independent energy generation.

Silver Sun Solar

Deltona, FL(340) 227-7785

Services

  • Installation of solar arrays.
  • Installation of batteries for energy storage.
  • Solar systems for selling electricity back to the grid.
  • Expertise in consulting on advantageous financing for solar.

ConEdison Solutions

Valhalla CDP, NY(914) 286-7000

Services

  • Installation of solar arrays.
  • Installation of batteries for energy storage.
  • Expertise in consulting on advantageous financing for solar.
  • Consulting on all things solar related.

Venture Home Solar

New York, NY(888) 417-2086

Services

  • Installation of solar arrays.
  • Installation of batteries for energy storage.
  • Expertise in consulting on advantageous financing for solar.

Sunnyside Solar

(802) 280-7319

Services

  • Installation of solar arrays.
  • Installation of batteries for energy storage.
  • Solar systems for selling electricity back to the grid.

Soltage

Jersey City, NJ(201) 432-1786

Services

  • Installation of solar arrays.
  • Installation of batteries for energy storage.
  • Expertise in consulting on advantageous financing for solar.

Venture Solar

(888) 417-2086

Services

  • Installation of solar arrays.
  • Solar systems for selling electricity back to the grid.
  • Expertise in consulting on advantageous financing for solar.

Engie North America

Houston, TX(713) 636-0000

Services

  • Installation of solar arrays.
  • Installation of batteries for energy storage.
  • Expertise in consulting on advantageous financing for solar.

Precision Renewables

Snyderville CDP, UT(435) 602-4120

Services

  • Installation of solar arrays.
  • Installation of batteries for energy storage.
  • Solar systems for selling electricity back to the grid.
Last Reviewed By: Fernando García
Published: 2022-09-18